Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Cosi fan tutte February 5, 7 matinee, 11, 13, 2010

love …with a twist

 

A deliciously ironic look at the foibles of love.

We begin with two sisters, their fiancés, and a bet—Will the women be faithful? “Of course,” brag the men. “Nay,” says the cynical Don Alfonso.

Thus we enter a world of disguises and trickery in which the women—and Love itself—are put to the test. And you can bet we’ll be on their side every step of the way! Mozart’s genius turns a farce into a scintillating blend of thought provoking humor.

The perfect opera for those who prefer their laughter sandwiched with a slice of wry.

 

Sung in Italian with English translations projected above the stage.

Performances held at the Keller Auditorium.

Performance length is approximately 3:20, including one intermission.

Audio description performance is Thursday, February 11.

 

Download the study guide here.
(The study guide requires a pdf reader. If you do not have one, please download the Adobe pdf reader here.)

 


Cast

Fiordiligi Lauren Skuce
Dorabella Angela Niederloh
DespinaChristine Brandes
Ferrando Ryan MacPherson
GuglielmoKeith Phares
Don AlfonsoRoberth Orth
   
Conductor George Manahan
Original DirectorJames Robinson
Stage Director Elise Sandell

ACT I — The sisters Fiordiligi and Dorabella are engaged to two young men, Guglielmo and Ferrando, respectively. The men have an older friend, Don Alfonso, who bets that he can get their sweethearts to fall in love with someone else. Ferrando and Guglielmo take him up on his wager, agreeing to do whatever he tells them. Don Alfonso enlists the help of Despina, the women’s maid, who is just as worldly wise as he is. The men enter and tell their sweethearts they have joined the army and must leave. After a tearful farewell, in which everyone promises to be faithful, the men return, disguised as dashing “Albanians,” and proceed to court each other’s fiancée. The women at first reject them, prompting them to fake their suicides. Despina, disguised as a doctor, "cures” them and the women begin to show some interest in their exotic admirers.

ACT II — Urged on by Despina, Fiordiligi and Dorabella decide that a little flirtation with the Albanians would be permissible. Guglielmo (still in disguise) renews his seduction of Dorabella and eventually succeeds in getting her to proclaim her love for him. Ferrando redoubles his efforts with Fiordiligi and she eventually succumbs to his charms. Don Alfonso arranges a double wedding, with Despina in disguise as the notary. Just after the women have signed the marriage contract, a military march is heard off-stage, representing the return of their sweethearts’ army regiment. The “Albanians” flee, soon to return as Ferrando and Guglielmo. The men seem shocked when they discover that their fiancées were about to marry two others. Eventually they admit the deception they’ve played on Fiordiligi and Dorabella, as do their co-conspirators Despina and Don Alfonso. The young couples acknowledge that they have learned an important lesson in understanding and forgiveness.

–Edited for the New Mozart Edition (Neue Mozart-Ausgabe) by Faye Ferguson and Wolfgang Rehm. By arrangement with Bärenreiter, publisher and copyright owner.

Così’s Nervous Laughter

“Let us make love at our convenience, to flatter ourselves.” —Lorenzo da Ponte, Così fan tutte

 

Così fan tutte is problematic. It troubles us. It stretches our credulity. It arouses our indignation. It unsettles us. Our laughter is nervous and uncomfortable. And yet, it is a masterpiece precisely because it manages all of those things. It is a comedy that demands that we take it seriously, that we turn it over in our minds, straining to reconcile a libretto that supposedly invites us to dismiss it and the music which requires us to believe it. If we cannot believe the truth and beauty of the music in Così fan tutte, can we trust the impression of our ears and hearts with any of Mozart’s music?

This seeming disconnect between music and libretto has bedeviled critics and audiences since the opera was revived in the 19th century. Critics have implied that it was a noble failure, a failure of “architecture.” The Romantics of the 19th century could not reconcile their vision of Mozart to this “immoral” play by Da Ponte. Beethoven and Wagner felt that the frivolous libretto was unworthy of him. Others muse that Mozart’s talent, his voice of God, could not write music to match such a childish scenario, and therefore his music is sublime because it was impossible for him to have created anything other than sublime. But that justification rings hollow. For a genius of Mozart’s caliber it makes no sense that he did not write music exactly as he wanted it, whenever he wanted it. If Da Ponte handed him a comedy, and Mozart wrote him an opera seria, then Mozart would have been, as musicologist Ernest Newman said, “…an ass. But Mozart was very far from being an ass.” And so the question remains. Why are we so uncomfortable after an evening at Così fan tutte?

We know that it is an “original” libretto by Da Ponte. Whereas Da Ponte’s other librettos were typically translated re-workings of other plays or librettos, Così is usually credited to Da Ponte alone. Most essays on the subject mention the 19th century canard that the action of the opera is based upon a true story of 18th century Vienna, suggested by the Emperor Josef himself. This is highly unlikely. There are no contemporary traces of such a scandal, and Josef was too ill at the time of the opera’s commission to have spent very much thought on it. Most of his available energy was spent running the campaign against the Ottoman Empire. The most likely source of this delicious, if dubious, explanation is 19th century desperation to mitigate Mozart’s responsibility for what was felt to be a reprehensible plot. The reasoning goes: if Mozart did not choose the topic, and was in no position to refuse it, then it doesn’t matter what we do in an effort to make the plot acceptable to us, as long as we preserve Mozart’s heavenly score. And producers during the 19th century had no compunction at all about mangling the plot to fit their needs. Evidently, Da Ponte’s artistry is of little or no concern.

There are other theories about where the plot came from. Anne Livermore contended in the 1960s that Così fan tutte had its roots in two plays by Tirso de Molina—the original author of the source material for Don Giovanni. This theory has been dismissed as wishful thinking and loose translation, but an examination of the argument leads one to conclude that there are intriguing, though stretched, similarities of plot. There is also a similarly long stretch in the theory that Così fan tutte is a flimsily veiled commentary on the “Kornman Scandal,” which deeply involved Guillaume Kornman (co-founder of the French mesmeric society), his adulterous wife, her lawyer (none other than the notorious Beaumarchais*), Salieri and Da Ponte! It is true that Da Ponte suggested a plot similar to Così to Salieri (who rejected it) and it is true that mesmerism was thoroughly lampooned in Così fan tutte, but the opera goes far beyond any obvious parallels.

Andrew Steptoe offers the most satisfying explanation for the strange tale of Così fan tutte. He suggests that Da Ponte simply blended two very pervasive literary themes: the myth of Cephalus and Procris with that of the “Wager.” What Da Ponte did that was truly original was to combine these two themes and to flip the motivations of the original protagonists on their heads. Ovid tells the tale of Cephalus, who married the lovely Procris. Suspicious of her fidelity, he creates an elaborate ruse, in which he leaves home, returns disguised as a romantic stranger to woo his own wife, is rebuffed, but upon offering her rare gifts, is accepted. When he reveals his true identity, Procris is mortified and leaves Cephalus. They are later reunited to share other adventures. Ovid was avidly studied by Da Ponte, as were the poets Tasso and Ariosto. Ariosto had made the Procris theme his in his tale of Rinaldo, who also tests his wife’s faithfulness by wooing her in another guise, but her righteous anger at being tested in such a way causes her to leave Rinaldo, and he is left wandering bereft. In Ariosto’s work from which the Rinaldo tale occurs, many familiar names appear: Rinaldo disguises himself as a wealthy suitor from Ferrara (Fiordiligi and Dorabella are ladies of Ferrara); Fiordiligi is a faithful wife; Doralice is a faithless lover and then there is the flirtatious Fiordespina. Da Ponte changes the motivation of both of these tales of deception by making his heroes not suspicious of their lady loves, but eager to defend their honor. This mirrors the second large theme of the “Wager.” The wager motif, which is seen in tales from Cervantes to Shakespeare, involves a man forced to defend the honor of his lover by participating in a wager. These wagers usually end in disaster. Da Ponte takes these themes and doubles the number of lovers, creating a perfectly balanced classically conceived libretto. The artistically satisfying symmetry of Così, with its beautifully paired six characters, is as undeniable as the beauty of Mozart’s music.

So what are we to make of all this? If we take Mozart’s score as a brilliant parody of opera seria, we feel duped by Mozart during the incredibly passionate seductions of the second act. How can we possibly accept that these besotted new couples can return to their conventionally acceptable pairings at the end of the opera as is traditionally the case? Even with a now-beneficent Alfonso reminding them that real love is preferable to their idealized notions of love, this ending rings hollow. Equally, if the director chooses to leave the seducers with each other’s original fiancées, can we truly believe that these new pairings based on deception can really work out? Bernard Williams offers us another option, one that is equally upsetting, but for a completely different reason:

Mozart meant his music. Fiordiligi and Dorabella experience their exciting new passions, as do the men seducing them. The emotions are true and deep, but real life makes its “bleakly reasonable demands.” In other words, “emotions are deep, indeed based in reality, but the world will go on as though they were not … the social order, which looks to things other than those emotional forces, will win out.” Fiordiligi will have made a connection with Ferrando, and it will be unlikely that she can find the same kind of passion with Guglielmo, but the expectations of the world demands her faithfulness to the status quo. That may be the bitterest pill of all. In this interpretation, the ambiguity arises not from who winds up with whom, but whether the opera condones the validity of life’s mundane demands to the detriment of “true love,” or merely illustrates how this is so. Our discomfort then lives alongside our laughter. The situations are funny; the characters may not always be so.

In the end, Così fan tutte is an unequivocal masterpiece, because it manages to wed our discomfort and our laughter. It is very, very funny. And it is very, very troubling. It is one of those most rare and wonderful evenings in which comedy and drama meet and meld until one cannot tell that there is any difference between the two at all. One is left laughing … and pondering. If we take it as simply a romp, we are missing something; if we take it purely
as a serious commentary, we are missing something else. Così is an entertainment, but not a simple one. Best to allow ourselves to laugh and ponder—and to revel in the ambiguity.

—Alexis Hamilton

* Beaumarchais was the brilliant French playwright responsible for Le mariage de Figaro, the source material for Da Ponte’s libretto for Mozart’s masterpiece, The Marriage of Figaro.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is arguably the greatest musician the world has ever known. With his most influential contemporaries of the classical period, Haydn and Beethoven, he brought the classical style to its height, and only he wrote successfully and prodigiously in all of the musical genres known at his time.

Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria, on January 27, 1756. He began studying the harpsichord early, taught by his father, Leopold, an eminent musician in his own right. He taught himself some of the pieces in his sister’s music books at four years old. The boy possessed a phenomenal capacity to assimilate everything taught to him.

At age six, Mozart’s father began to tour him to the various music centers of Europe as a child prodigy performer. Often “tested” by prominent musicians in each of the cities he toured, the child Mozart was never known to be wrong. He could, blindfolded, name any note played on the piano. He remembered that family friend, J. A. Schachtner’s violin was tuned an eighth tone lower than his own, and once he picked up a second violin part and played it perfectly at sight. At that time, Mozart had never taken a violin lesson.

Expanding on his prowess as the performing child prodigy, Mozart began to compose. He wrote minuets when he was five, a sonata at seven, and a symphony at eight. In Vienna, in 1768, the Austrian Emperor commissioned him to write an opera, but the work Mozart composed, La finta semplice (The Pretend Simpleton), was not presented because the artists at the opera house refused to participate in an opera composed by a child! He was only 12 years old.

Mozart continued to compose a great variety of musical compositions as he matured, all of his work demonstrating exceptional genius. But as he became an adult, the public became less fascinated with him as a performer, and his genius as a composer was not yet recognized. During his life, his critics always felt his music to be “audacious, too highly flavored … too complex for the average listener to follow.” As a result, he always had to struggle to support himself and his family.

The operatic works which achieved the greatest success at their premieres, The Marriage of Figaro and Don Giovanni, were written with librettist Lorenzo da Ponte. The third product of this collaboration, Così fan tutte, was considered a failure in its own time but enjoys considerable popularity in opera houses around the world today.

In addition to myriad pieces for the concert platform, Mozart completed 25 works for the stage, including serenatas, intermezzi, operettas, comedies and plays with music. He was the first to create important operas employing texts set in the German language: The Abduction from the Seraglio and The Magic Flute. His Italian operas (written in collaboration with da Ponte) have influenced the composition of music written for the stage ever since.

Mozart continued his awesome creative output in spite of poverty and failing health. He died in Vienna on December 5, 1791, at the age of 35. Much rumor and intrigue surround the circumstances of his death.

Today, Mozart’s influence and genius are undisputed. Waves of Mozart scholarship flood us with available information and interpretation. Luckily, we need only listen to the wonderful sweetness and humanity of his music to know his brilliance first hand in its purity.

Lauren SkuceLauren Skuce - Fiordiligi

Soprano

Portland Opera Debut
Lauren Skuce is noted for her versatility on both the opera and concert stage, and is acknowledged as one of today's rising young artists.

 Lauren Skuce

Lauren Skuce - Fiordiligi

Soprano

 

Portland Opera Debut

Lauren Skuce is noted for her versatility on both the opera and concert stage, and is acknowledged as one of today's rising young artists. She created the role of Heloise in the world premiere of Stephen Paulus' Heloise and Abelard with the Juilliard Opera Center and portrayed Ophelia in Hamlet with Opera Theatre of Saint Louis to immense critical acclaim. As a 2007 fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center, she sang Fiordiligi in Così fan tutte under James Levine. Of that appearance The New York Times observed, "Ms. Skuce gave a splendid performance, singing with warm, rich tone and endless agility."

Lauren Skuce's 2008/09 season currently includes the roles of Marguerite in Faust with Opera Grand Rapids and Susanna in Le nozze di Figaro in her debut with Florida Grand Opera. In 2007/08 she performed as Fiordiligi in a return engagement with Boston Baroque, as Mimi in La bohème with Madison Opera, was heard in a recital of Russian art song for the Helicon Foundation, sang as soloist in Mahler's Symphony No. 2 with the Columbus Symphony Orchestra and in Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 with the Albany Symphony Orchestra. In the summer of 2008, Ms. Skuce performed Dorella in Wagner's Das Liebesverbot at Glimmerglass Opera.

During the 2006/07 season, Ms. Skuce appeared as Mimi in La bohème with Kentucky Opera, and as Ophélie in Hamlet with the Lyric Opera of Kansas City. Concert performances included Bruce Adolphe's Wind Across the Sky with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and Verdi's Requiem at the University of Pennsylvania.

Recent season highlights include Liù in Turandot with Opera Hong Kong; Alexandra in Blitzstein's Regina and two rarely performed works by Shostakovich - Lidochka in Shostakovich's only musical, Moscow: Cherry Tree Towers, and Podtochina's Daughter in Shostakovich's opera, The Nose - all at Bard's SummerScape Festival. She appeared as the Countess in Le nozze di Figaro with the Lyric Opera of Kansas City and with Syracuse Opera, as Marguerite in Faust with Palm Beach Opera, in Haydn's Scena di Berenice and as Morgana in Handel's Alcina with Boston Baroque, and as Micaëla in Carmen with Opera Theatre of Saint Louis.

With New York City Opera, Lauren Skuce made her debut as Lucia in The Rape of Lucretia, performed Mrs. Anderssen in A Little Night Music, Suor Genevieve in Suor Angelica, Laoula in L'Étoile, and returned to sing Morgana in a new production of Handel's Alcina. Other operatic highlights include Albina in La donna del lago with Opera Orchestra of New York, Susanna in Le nozze di Figaro and Helena in A Midsummer Night's Dream with Wolf Trap Opera, Adele in Die Fledermaus with San Francisco Opera's Western Opera Theater, Ophelia in Hamlet with Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, and Blanche de la Force in Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites and the title role in Cavalli's La Calisto with the Juilliard Opera Center.

Ms. Skuce made her Carnegie Hall debut with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra performing Pergolesi's Stabat Mater. On the concert stage, she sang the Mozart Requiem and Mahler Symphony No. 4 with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra, appeared and toured with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, performed Messiah with the Pacific Symphony Orchestra, was soloist in Shostakovich's Symphony No. 14 at Bard SummerScape, and performed Messiah at Carnegie Hall with the Oratorio Society of New York.

An accomplished recitalist, Lauren Skuce made her New York City recital debut in Alice Tully Hall, and has appeared with the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, the Marlboro Music Festival, and the New York Festival of Song in works varying from Caccini to Shostakovich and Gershwin. She has been heard in New York under the auspices of the Marilyn Horne Foundation's recital series "On Wings of Song," in a recital of Tchaikovsky songs at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and in solo recital in West Palm Beach.

A Sullivan Award winner, Ms. Skuce is the recipient of many notable prizes, including the 2002 DeRosa Career Grant from the Juilliard School, the Catherine Filene Shouse Study Grant from Wolf Trap Opera, the Richard Gaddes Fund Career Grant from Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, a London Foundation Career Grant, a Licia Albanese-Puccini Foundation Study Grant, and an Opera Index award.

http://www.herbertbarrett.com/artist.php?id=lskuce

Angela Niederloh - Mezzo-soprano

Angela Niederloh - Dorabella

Mezzo-soprano

Previously at Portland Opera:  
The Journey To Reims, 2004; The Magic Flute, 2007; Cinderella, 2007; La Calisto, 2009

Acclaimed by The New York Times as “an exciting coloratura mezzo-soprano,” Angela Niederloh is in demand by opera, concert and recital presenters across the United States.

Angela Niederloh - Mezzo-soprano

Angela Niederloh - Dorabella

Mezzo-soprano

 

Previously at Portland Opera:  
The Journey To Reims, 2004; The Magic Flute, 2007; Cinderella, 2007; La Calisto, 2009

Acclaimed by The New York Times as “an exciting coloratura mezzo-soprano,” Angela Niederloh is in demand by opera, concert and recital presenters across the United States. A compelling stage presence, Miss Niederloh has garnered praise for her performances in a wide range of repertoire.  Miss Niederloh’s recent engagements include the title role in Cinderella with Portland Opera, and Falstaff with Bryn Terfel, as the saucy Meg Page with Houston Grand Opera.  Other roles with Portland Opera include Third Lady in The Magic Flute and Melibea in Rossini’s Il Viaggio a Rheims.  During her tenure as a member of the Houston Grand Opera Studio, Miss Niederloh appeared as Giovanna in Rigoletto, Filipevna in Eugene Onegin, Poklizeèka in The Makropolis Case, Olga in The Merry Widow, Rosette in Manon, Flora in La Traviata with René Flemming, directed by Frank Corsaro and conducted by Patrick Summers, Second Lady in Die Zauberflöte and Karolka in a David Alden’s production of Jenùfa.

Miss Niederloh made her professional operatic debut as Berta in Il Barbiere di Sivilgia with Chautauqua Opera where she also covered the Composer in Ariadne auf Naxos. Following her engagements with Chautauqua Opera she was invited to join the San Francisco Opera Merola Program where she performed Zita in Gianni Schicchi with maestro Joseph Coloneri and Dorabella in John Copley’s production of Cosi fan Tutte. Summers 2003 and 2004 took Ms. Niederloh to Wolftrap Opera. There she portrayed Annio in Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito, Giannetta in L’elisir d’amore and Ms. Slender in Salieri’s Falstaff.

An accomplished musician, Angela Niederloh’s ability to interpret new works has led her to the Aspen Music Festival where she performed in the North American premiere of H.K. Gruber’s Gloria, directed by Edward Berkeley. Miss Niederloh reprieved her portrayal of Berta in Il Barbiere di Sivilgia with Opera Southwest where she also sang her first Suzuki in Madame Butterfly, a role she later performed with Houston’s critically acclaimed Orchestra X, conducted by James Lowe, assistant conductor of the Houston Grand Opera. Other regional performances include the Mother in Menotti’s Amahl and the Night Visitors with Opera Omaha and Prince Orlofsky in Die Fledermaus with the Columbia Symphony Orchestra. Equally comfortable on the concert stage, Miss Niederloh made her Oregon Symphony debut in an exciting performance of Bernstein’s Mass and Mahler’s Second Symphony under the baton of Murry Sidlin. She has also graced audiences with her lush interpretations of the baroque repertoire with the Portland Baroque Orchestra in their annual portrayal of Handel’s Messiah. Commemorating the late Robert Shaw, Angela Niederloh received a special invitation to perform the difficult solo role in Aaron Copland’s In the Beginning with the acclaimed Choral Cross Ties. Reviewing her performance, The Oregonian critic David Stabler wrote “mezzo-soprano Angela Niederloh is the real thing. We’ll be hearing from her for years to come!”  Additional concert engagements include solo performances of Messiah and Vivaldi’s Gloria with the Oregon Choral Arts Ensemble under the direction of Roger Doyle.

Miss Niederloh is in high demand for her dramatic and fresh interpretations of art song repertoire.  She has performed at the 1999 Chautauqua Institution in “Art Songs at the Athenaeum” where she gave a memorable performance of Robert Schumann’s Frauenliebe und Leben as well as Aaron Copland’s Emily Dickenson Songs. That same year, Miss Niederloh was invited to perform a solo recital with the Portland Opera Guild Young Artist Recital Series. In 2002 Miss Niederloh was chosen to participate in recital with composer Jake Heggie premiering several of his new works. She has also been featured in recital with Steven Blier in programs entitled “Songs from the Opera Composers” and “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun”.

Angela Niederloh holds her Bachelor of Arts in Music Degree from Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. Her attendance at Portland State University was supported by the Laurel’s Scholarship. A frequent participant in some of the nation’s most prestigious competitions, Angela Niederloh was launched into the national spotlight as a Finalist in the 2000 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions where she performed with the Met Orchestra under the direction of Paul Nadler. February of 2004, Ms. Niederloh was awarded first place and audience favorite at the Eleanor Lieber Awards. In 2000 she placed 2nd in the MacAllister Awards Competition. As a member of the Chautauqua Opera Studio Artist Program she received the Studio Artist Award and an invitation to return the following season as an Apprentice Artist. Immediately following these exciting successes Miss Niederloh was selected as a Finalist in the 2001 Houston Grand Opera Eleanor McCollum Competition and in 2002 she placed 2nd in Dallas Opera Guild Competition while being selected as a finalist in the MacAllister Awards Competition.

 

Christine BrandesChristine Brandes - Despina

Soprano

Portland Opera Debut

Noted for her radiant, crystalline voice and superb musicianship, soprano Christine Brandes brings her committed artistry to repertoire ranging from the 17th century to newly composed works and enjoys an active career in North America and abroad, ...

 Christine Brandes

Christine Brandes - Despina

Soprano

Portland Opera Debut

Noted for her radiant, crystalline voice and superb musicianship, soprano Christine Brandes brings her committed artistry to repertoire ranging from the 17th century to newly composed works and enjoys an active career in North America and abroad, performing at many of the world’s most distinguished festivals and concert series in programs spanning from recitals and chamber music to oratorio and opera.

In the 2008/09 season Ms. Brandes’s operatic appearances include return engagements with the Lyric Opera of Kansas City as Cleopatra in Giulio Cesare and with the Seattle Opera as Susanna in Le nozze di Figaro. She also covers the role of Ginevra in Ariodante at San Francisco Opera. Concert performances see her with the National Symphony Orchestra in Messiah and with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra in Handel’s L'Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato.

During the past season, Ms. Brandes made her Washington National Opera debut as Catherine in William Bolcom’s A View from the Bridge and returned to the Central City Opera as Maria Corona in Gian Carlo Menotti’s The Saint of Bleecker Street. Her busy concert schedule included performances of Schumann’s Das Paradies und die Peri with Sir Simon Rattle and the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Mozart Requiem with John Nelson and the Handel & Haydn Society, Bach’s St. Matthew Passion with Jane Glover and the Music of the Baroque, Handel’s L’Allegro with the Mark Morris Dance Group and the Seattle Symphony, and Haydn’s Mass in the Time of War with Bernard Labadie and the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra.

Recent symphonic appearances have included concerts with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under the batons of both Pierre Boulez and Esa-Pekka Salonen, performances of John Adams’s El Niño with the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra, Bach’s St. John Passion with Robert Spano and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, L’Enfant et les Sortilèges with Sir Simon Rattle and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Mozart’s Requiem with the Cleveland Orchestra and John Nelson, Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 with Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos and Beethoven’s Egmont with Wolfgang Sawallisch and the Philadelphia Orchestra, Mozart opera arias and Strauss orchestral songs with the National Symphony Orchestra and Heinz Fricke, Bach Cantatas with the New World Symphony Orchestra, Handel’s Messiah with the Toronto Symphony, the New York Philharmonic, and the Minnesota Orchestra, Carmina Burana with the Houston Symphony, Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater with Neeme Järvi and the Detroit Symphony, and Barber’s Knoxville: Summer of 1915, and Mahler’s Symphony No. 4 with Andreas Delfs and the Milwaukee Symphony. She also has bowed at Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival and at the Ravinia Festival with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra as well as with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, Ensemble Orchestral de Paris, Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and the Freiburger Barockorchester, among others.

Christine Brandes’s operatic career has been highlighted by engagements at Houston Grand Opera in Ariodante with Christopher Hogwood and in Falstaff with Patrick Summers; at Seattle Opera in Giulio Cesare; and at the Los Angeles Opera in L’Incoronazione di Poppea with Harry Bicket and in Hänsel und Gretel with Alan Gilbert. Additional performances of the artist’s distinguished career have brought her to San Diego Opera in Ariodante, Lyric Opera of Kansas City in The Turn of the Screw, Central City Opera in L’Incoronazione di Poppea, Lisbon’s Gulbenkian Foundation in Così fan tutte, Opera Theatre of St. Louis in Cimarosa’s The Secret Marriage, Glimmerglass Opera both in Handel’s Orlando and Acis and Galatea, San Francisco Opera in Semele under the baton of Sir Charles Mackerras, the Opéra de Nancy in Alcina, New York City Opera in Acis and Galatea and Platée, and to the Opera Company of Philadelphia in Die Zauberflöte, L’Elisir d’amore, and Don Giovanni. Additionally, Ms. Brandes has performed Le nozze di Figaro with New York City Opera, Opera Pacific, and with the opera companies of Minnesota, Montréal, Philadelphia, and Québec.

Christine Brandes has recorded for EMI, BMG/Conifer Classics, Dorian, Harmonia Mundi USA, Virgin Classics, and Koch International.

www.imgartists.com

Ryan MacPhersonRyan MacPherson - Ferrando

Tenor

Previously at Portland Opera: Orphée, 2009, The Turn of the Screw, 2009

Ryan MacPherson is one of the most in-demand young tenors of this generation.  This season he made his role debut with New York City Opera as Anathol in VANESSA and has recently added the role of Don José in CARMEN to his repertoire, with notable performances with Opera Memphis, Festival Opera of Walnut Creek and at the National Concert Hall in Dublin.

 Ryan MacPherson

Ryan MacPherson - Ferrando

Tenor

Previously at Portland Opera: Orphée, 2009, The Turn of the Screw, 2009

Ryan MacPherson is one of the most in-demand young tenors of this generation.  This season he made his role debut with New York City Opera as Anathol in VANESSA and has recently added the role of Don José in CARMEN to his repertoire, with notable performances with Opera Memphis, Festival Opera of Walnut Creek and at the National Concert Hall in Dublin.  He also made his company debut at the Opera National de Paris (Bastille) as the Vision of a Young Man in DIE FRAU OHNE SCHATTEN and role debut as Ruggero in LA RONDINE with Sarasota Opera and performances of Don Ottavio in DON GIOVANNI with Utah Symphony and Opera and George Hancock in MARGARET GARNER with Michigan Opera Theatre.  Mr. MacPherson wraps up the year with the New York Philharmonic where he is featured in performances of ELEKTRA in concert under the baton of Maestro Maazel.  Upcoming engagements include Rodolfo in LA BOHÈME with Lyric Opera Productions in Dublin, Tamino in THE MAGIC FLUTE with Florentine Opera, the title role in CANDIDE with Toledo Opera, Heurtebise in ORPHÉE and Ferrando in COSÌ FAN TUTTE both with Portland Opera.

Last season Mr. MacPherson took the stage as Ferrando in COSÌ FAN TUTTE for New York City Opera and opened their previous season as Flamand in CAPRICCIO after touring with the company in Japan as Laurie in LITTLE WOMEN.  He is a recent recipient of the Richard F. Gold Career Award honoring his contribution as a young artist to New York City Opera.  Other notable roles from last season include Belmonte in ABDUCTION FROM THE SERAGLIO with Michigan Opera Theatre, Luis in THE GONDOLIERS with the Utah Symphony and Opera and roles in the concert productions of Zemlinsky's DER FERNE KLANG and Smyth's THE WRECKERS with the American Symphony Orchestra.

Mr. MacPherson also recently performed his first Duke in RIGOLETTO with Opera Memphis and then made debuts with Lyric Opera Kansas City repeating the role of Camille in THE MERRY WIDOW and with Shreveport Opera in the title role of FAUST and the role of Hot Biscuit Slim in PAUL BUNYAN with Central City Opera.

In 2003, Mr. MacPherson made his Opera Memphis debut as Rodolfo in LA BOHÈME and in the spring of 2004 returned to sing the role of George Shannon in the world premiere of LEWIS AND CLARK.  That summer he traveled to Long Beach Opera for Henry Morosus' DIE SCHWEIGSAME FRAU with Andreas Mitisek directing and returned to New York City Opera where he created the role of Iff the Water Genie in the world premiere of Charles Wuorinen's HAROUN, SEA OF STORIES and was heard by Opera Memphis audiences as Camille in THE MERRY WIDOW.

He has toured the nation twice with San Francisco Opera's Western Opera Theatre Tour; once as Alfred in DIE FLEDERMAUS and again as Ferrando in COSÌ FAN TUTTE.  He also created the roles of Reporter and Cardinal O'Connoll for the world premiere of Anton Coppola's SACCO AND VANZETTI for Opera Tampa.  Other performance highlights include Eisenstein with the San Francisco Opera's Merola Program production of DIE FLEDERMAUS; Roderigo in OTELLO with Opera Theatre of St. Louis and Opera Omaha; Rinuccio in GIANNI SCHICCHI with the Metro Lyric Opera of New Jersey and the Merola Program; Sam in SUSANNAH at the Aspen Music Festival; Don Ottavio in DON GIOVANNI at the Bardavon 1869 Opera House.

Included in the prestigious companies throughout the United States, he has sung with Opera Omaha in the role of Remendado in CARMEN followed by his debut with the New York City Opera in SALOME as the Third Jew and in LE NOZZE DI FIGARO as Don Curzio.  In 2003 he made his debut with Toledo Opera in the role of Ferrando in COSÌ FAN TUTTE.

Mr. MacPherson made his Carnegie Hall and Kennedy Center debuts creating the role of Meriwether Lewis in Michael Ching's new opera CORPS OF DISCOVERY.  Mr. MacPherson's oratorio engagements have included Stravinsky Renard, Ravel L'enfant et les Sortilèges, Haydn Lord Nelson Mass, Mozart Vesperae Solennes De Confessore and Requiem, and Handel Ode On St. Cecilia's Day and Messiah.

As graduate student of Yale University, Ryan MacPherson performed the roles of Rodolfo in LA BOHÈME, Vaudemont in Tchaikovsky's IOLANTA, Fenton in FALSTAFF, Ein Soldat in DER KAISER VON ATLANTIS and Eisenstein in DIE FLEDERMAUS.  Prior to his studies at Yale, he attended the University of Missouri-Columbia, and was heard as Sam in SUSANNAH, Tony in WEST SIDE STORY and Whizzer in MARCH OF THE FLASETTOS.

www.ryanmacpherson.com

 

Keith PharesKeith Phares - Guglielmo

Baritone


Previously at Portland Opera: Nixon in China, 2006

Noted by the press for his dashingly attractive stage presence, commanding vocal authority, and creamy, warm baritone voice, Keith Phares is acclaimed both on the opera and concert stage as one of today’s most versatile artists.

 Keith Phares

Keith Phares - Guglielmo

Baritone


Previously at Portland Opera: Nixon in China, 2006

Noted by the press for his dashingly attractive stage presence, commanding vocal authority, and creamy, warm baritone voice, Keith Phares is acclaimed both on the opera and concert stage as one of today’s most versatile artists.

During the 2008/09 season Keith Phares makes his San Francisco Opera debut in the Company’s premiere of Jake Heggie’s Three Decembers, singing opposite Frederica von Stade. He debuts with the Opera Company of Philadelphia as Haly in L’Italiana in Algeri and bows as Falke in Opera New Jersey’s presentation of Die Fledermaus, singing opposite Ruth Ann Swenson. The artist returns to the Washington National Opera as Ned Keene in Peter Grimes and offers a recital under the auspices of the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts.

Keith Phares made his Houston Grand Opera debut last season under the direction of Patrick Summers in the world premiere of Jake Heggie’s Last Acts and returned to the stage of the Opera Theatre of Saint Louis in a new production of Martín y Soler’s Una Cosa Rara. Continuing his fervent commitment to bringing the works of living composers to the stage, the artist sang the title role of Elmer Gantry, by Robert Aldridge, in a co-production with Nashville Opera and Montclair State University (NJ). The artist offered Five Movements for My Father in a program of chamber music by Susan Kander at Weill Hall in New York: his performance coincided with the commercial release of this work on the Loosecans Music label. Mr. Phares returned to the roster of the Metropolitan Opera to cover the role of Count Almaviva in Le nozze di Figaro and to cover Mercutio in Roméo et Juliette.

Operatic highlights of recent seasons include a Metropolitan Opera debut, under the baton of James Levine, in the French triple-bill Parade, performances of The Pilot in the Francesca Zambello production of The Little Prince at New York City Opera and Boston Lyric Opera, Maurice Bendrix in Jake Heggie’s The End of the Affair with the Lyric Opera of Kansas City and Madison Opera, Harlequin in Ariadne auf Naxos at the Dallas Opera, Chou-En Lai in Portland Opera’s presentation of Nixon in China, Danilo in The Merry Widow in a return engagement at the Lyric Opera of Kansas City, Masetto in the acclaimed Günter Krämer production of Don Giovanni at the Spoletto Festival USA, and Sebastian in the North American premiere of Thomas Adès’ The Tempest presented by the Santa Fe Opera in a new production by Jonathan Kent and conducted by Alan Gilbert.

Additional credits of note include Billy Budd at Washington National Opera, Sweeney Todd, Il Ritorno d’Ulisse in Patria, and Die Tote Stadt at New York City Opera, Don Pasquale, La Cenerentola, and The Mikado for Arizona Opera, Faust and Cold Sassy Tree with Utah Symphony & Opera, Beatrice and Benedict at Santa Fe Opera, The End of the Affair at Madison Opera, and Così fan tutte, and Il Barbiere di Siviglia at Boston Lyric Opera. With the Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, he has been seen as Charles Lindbergh in Loss of Eden by Cary John Franklin and as Pip in Miss Havisham’s Fire by Dominick Argento.

Concert highlights include Béatrice et Bénèdict with the New York Philharmonic under the baton of Sir Colin Davis, Candide with the San Francisco Symphony and Patrick Summers, Gerald Barry’s The Triumph of Beauty and Deceit with Thomas Adès and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and a program of Rogers and Hammerstein songs with the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra. He also has been honored to be affiliated for many seasons with the Marilyn Horne Foundation, under whose auspices he has appeared in numerous recitals and master classes throughout the United States.

A graduate of the Juilliard Opera Center, he was a national winner of the 1998 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions and a finalist in the 1999 Eleanor McCollum Competition of the Houston Grand Opera. He also has been recognized with a Richard Gaddes Grant from the Opera Theatre of Saint Louis and the 2000 Richard F. Gold Career Grant from the Juilliard School of Music.

www.imgartists.com/?page=artist&id=162

 

Robert OrthRobert Orth - Don Alfonso

Baritone


Previously at Portland Opera: Gianni Schicchi, 1985; Pagliacci, 1985; Romeo et Juliette, 1987; Don Pasquale, 1990; Die Fledermaus, 1994; Madame Butterfly, 1996; The Love for Three Oranges, 1998; La Belle Helene, 2001; Candide, 2002; A View From The Bridge, 2003; The Journey To Reims, 2004; Nixon in China, 2006

Robert Orth is a leading baritone with major opera companies...

Robert Orth

Robert Orth - Don Alfonso

Baritone


Previously at Portland Opera: Gianni Schicchi, 1985; Pagliacci, 1985; Romeo et Juliette, 1987; Don Pasquale, 1990; Die Fledermaus, 1994; Madame Butterfly, 1996; The Love for Three Oranges, 1998; La Belle Helene, 2001; Candide, 2002; A View From The Bridge, 2003; The Journey To Reims, 2004; Nixon in China, 2006

Robert Orth is a leading baritone with major opera companies including those in New York City, San Francisco, Chicago, Toronto, Washington, D.C., Houston, Seattle, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Miami, Portland, Indianapolis, Cleveland, and Denver.  He was named “Artist of the Year” by both New York City Opera and Seattle Opera. New York City Opera also gave him the Christopher Keene Award for new and unusual repertoire. He has appeared as soloist with the symphony orchestras of Chicago, Cleveland, Milwaukee, Seattle, Denver, Indianapolis, and Washington, D.C., in repertoire ranging from Brahms' REQUIEM to Broadway pops to his most repeated symphonic piece, CARMINA BURANA.

Performing new American operas has brought Mr. Orth great pleasure and acclaim.  He was John Buchanan, Jr., in Lee Hoiby's SUMMER AND SMOKE (based on the Tennessee Williams play), which was broadcast nationally on Public Television.  At the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, he was Count Almaviva in the premiere of ROSINA. In Milwaukee he was Fantomas in Stanley Silverman's HOTEL FOR CRIMINALS.  He played the Lodger in Dominic Argento's THE ASPERN PAPERS in its east coast premiere at the Kennedy Center; and he was the Lecturer in Argento's one-man opera A WATERBIRD TALK in Chicago.  Also in Chicago, he sang the central role of the Father in Hugo Weissgall's SIX CHARACTERS IN SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR in its second professional production.  He created the title role in the world premiere of HARVEY MILK by Stewart Wallace and Michael Korie in Houston, New York and San Francisco.  In 1997 he portrayed Frank Lloyd Wright in SHINING BROW, a new opera by Daron Aric Hagen, based on the life of the great American architect. In 2000 he played Owen Hart in San Francisco in the world premiere of DEAD MAN WALKING, with music by Jake Heggie and libretto by Terrence McNally. In 2001 he premiered Michael John LaChiusa's LOVERS AND FRIENDS (CHATAUQUA VARIATIONS) in Chicago. In 2002 he premiered Garrison Keillor's new opera MR. AND MRS. OLSON in St. Paul. In 2004 he was Mr. Parkis in the premiere of Jake Heggie's THE END OF THE AFFAIR, Richard Nixon in John Adams' NIXON IN CHINA in St. Louis. In 2007 he was Uncle John in the world premiere of Ricky Ian Gordon's THE GRAPES OF WRATH, and Capt. Compson in MIDNIGHT ANGEL by David Carlson. And this year he premiered SINNERS, a song cycle written for him by Craig Bohmler and Marion Adler. His recordings include THE TELEPHONE by Gian Carlo Menotti, SIX CHARACTERS IN SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR, HARVEY MILK, DEAD MAN WALKING, and HANSEL AND GRETEL.

Mr. Orth also enjoys performing the most popular and familiar operas and operettas.  Figaro in THE BARBER OF SEVILLE and Eisenstein in DIE FLEDERMAUS have become his signature roles.  He has often appeared as Malatesta in DON PASQUALE, Danilo in THE MERRY WIDOW, Guglielmo in COSI FAN TUTTE, Dandini in LA CENERENTOLA, Germont in LA TRAVIATA, and Sharpless in MADAMA BUTTERFLY.

Robert Orth began his career in summer stock doing plays and musicals. He continues to do them whenever possible. He has been Billy Bigelow in CAROUSEL, El Gallo in THE FANTASTICKS, Henry Higgins in MY FAIR LADY, and, most often, Don Quixote in THE MAN OF LA MANCHA.

Future engagements include CARMINA BURANA and NIXON IN CHINA in Denver; THE GRAPES OF WRATH in Pittsburgh and Costa Mesa; DEAD MAN WALKING in Houston; the world premiere of Andre Previn's BRIEF ENCOUNTER, also in Houston; two world premieres in Dallas - MOBY DICK and AUG. 4,1964; as well as A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC, THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE, COSI FAN TUTTE, GIANNI SCHICCHI and BUOSO'S GHOST.

www.orthweb.com

 

George Manahan - Conductor

George Manahan - Conductor

 

In his twelfth season as Music Director of New York City Opera, the wide-ranging and versatile George Manahan has had an esteemed career embracing everything from opera to the concert stage, the traditional to the contemporary. He has been hailed for his leadership at City Opera, where he "gets from his players the kind of heartfelt involvement unthinkable in the City Opera orchestra pit 20 years ago...these musicians operate with such consistent energy and involvement." (The New York Times)

George Manahan - Conductor

George Manahan - Conductor

ACCLAIM

“What a difference it makes to hear the piece performed by an opera conductor who palpably believes in it … the fervent and sensitive performance that Mr. Manahan presided over made the best case for this opera that I have encountered.”
- Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times

"The Orchestra of St. Luke’s exceeded its usual high standard for versatility; George Manahan, the conductor, did an outstanding job of keeping everything in sync."
- Steve Smith, The New York Times

"George Manahan conducted and got from his players the kind of heartfelt involvement unthinkable in the City Opera orchestra pit 20 years ago."
- Bernard Holland, The New York Times

BIOGRAPHY

Previously at Portland Opera:
The Barber of Seville, 2010
Così fan tutte, 2010
Rigoletto, 2009
Rodelinda, 2008
Macbeth, 2006

In his twelfth season as Music Director of New York City Opera, the wide-ranging and versatile George Manahan has had an esteemed career embracing everything from opera to the concert stage, the traditional to the contemporary. He has been hailed for his leadership at City Opera, where he "gets from his players the kind of heartfelt involvement unthinkable in the City Opera orchestra pit 20 years ago...these musicians operate with such consistent energy and involvement." (The New York Times)

George Manahan has distinguished himself throughout the world as one of the foremost conductors of our time, and is especially known in the opera world for his musical guidance of diverse productions including productions of La Faniculla del West, Daphne, Ermione, Dialogues of the Carmelites, Cendrillon, Die Tote Stadt. He has also toured Japan with NYCO's production of Little Women.

Mr. Manahan’s guest appearances include the symphonies of Atlanta, San Francisco, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Charlotte, and New Jersey, where he served as acting Music Director for four seasons, as well as the National Symphony and Juilliard and Manhattan Schools of Music, the Warsaw Philharmonic, the Music Academy of the West, and the Aspen Music Festival. He is a regular guest with the opera companies of Santa Fe, Portland, and Glimmerglass Opera, and has also appeared with the opera companies of Seattle, Chicago, Opera Theatre of St. Louis, Opera National du Paris, Teatro de Communale de Bologna, the Bergen Festival (Norway), the Casals Festival (Puerto Rico) and Minnesota Opera, where he was principal conductor. As music director of the Richmond Symphony (VA) from 1987-98, where in addition to conducting, he also appeared as piano soloist, he was honored four times by the American Society of Composers and Publishers (ASCAP) for his commitment to 20th-century music.

That passion for the music of our time was ignited when, in one season, Mr. Manahan was chosen as the Exxon Arts Endowment Conductor of the New Jersey Symphony and he made his mark on the opera world debuting with the Santa Fe Opera conducting the American premiere of Arnold Schoenberg's opera Von Heute Auf Morgen. That enthusiasm continues today; he has conducted numerous world premieres, including Wuorinen’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories, Tobias Picker's Emmeline and many others.

His many appearances on television include productions of La Boheme, Lizzie Borden, and Tosca on PBS. Live from Lincoln Center’s telecast of New York City Opera's production of Madame Butterfly under his direction won a 2007 Emmy Award. Mr. Manahan's discography includes the Grammy Award nominated recording of Edward Thomas' Desire Under The Elms, with the London Symphony, and Steve Reich's Tehillim on the EMI-Warner Brothers label, as well as two albums of 20th century concertos for clarinet featuring Richard Stolzmann. He also appears on the Elan, New Albion, and Naxos label.

His recent Carnegie Hall performance of Samuel Barber's Antony and Cleopatra was hailed by audiences and critics alike, "What a difference it makes to hear the piece performed by an opera conductor who palpably believes in it,” said the New York Times, “The fervent and sensitive performance that Mr. Manahan presided over made the best case for this opera that I have encountered."  For the 2009 – 2010 season, Mr. Manahan continues as Music Director at New York City Opera and will conduct performances of Weisgall’s Esther and Madama Butterfly.  He will also conduct Portland Opera’s productions of Così fan tutte and Il barbiere di Siviglia.

Last season for Mr. Manahan included the World Premiere of ASK YOUR MAMA at Carnegie Hall, a collaboration between Emmy Award-winning composer Laura Karpman and soprano Jessye Norman based on the text of Langston Hughes, in which Mr. Manahan led the orchestra of St. Luke's and soloists Jessye Norman, Lizz Wright, and The Roots. The work will also be heard at the Hollywood Bowl and elsewhere across the country.  Also in 2008 – 2009, Mr. Manahan conducted performances of Gilbert and Sullivan’s Iolanthe with the San Francisco Symphony, appeared in a concert performance of Gluck's Alceste featuring Deborah Voigt and the Collegiate Chorale, with the Westchester Philharmonic, and conducted  Rigoletto at Portland Opera, Mignon at the Music Academy of the West and La bohème at the Aspen Music Festival.

He received his formal musical training at the Manhattan School of Music, studying conducting with Anton Coppola and George Schick, and was appointed to the faculty of the school upon his graduation, at which time The Juilliard School awarded him a fellowship as Assistant Conductor with the American Opera Center.

http://www.cami.com/?webid=291

 

Elise SandellElise Sandell - Stage Director

 

Portland Opera Stage Director Debut

Elise Sandell made her mainstage directorial debut with Tulsa Opera’s production of Carmen in February 2007, which was referred to in Tulsa World as “marvelous entertainment” and “a sublime experience.”

 Elise Sandell

Elise Sandell - Stage Director

 

Portland Opera Stage Director Debut

Elise Sandell made her mainstage directorial debut with Tulsa Opera’s production of Carmen in February 2007, which was referred to in Tulsa World as “marvelous entertainment” and “a sublime experience.”

She has worked frequently with Houston Grand Opera, and in November of 2007 she directed the world premiere performance of HGO’s newly commissioned “operatorio” The Refuge composed by Christopher Theofanidis with libretto by Leah Lax. Her debut with HGO was as assistant director on Idomeneo during the 04/05 Season and she has returned often, serving as associate director on Olivier Tambosi’s productions of Manon Lescaut and Un Ballo in Maschera, as well as Elijah Moshinsky’s production of Simon Boccanegra.

Elise has also worked frequently with Central City Opera, and in 2008 she directed their apprentice production of Curlew River. In addition to serving as assistant director on several of their productions, she has also been a director for their “Opera à la Carte” scenes program and their production of The Face on the Barroom Floor.

Elise has worked extensively as an assistant director with such companies as Opera Co. of Philadelphia, Dallas Opera, Utah Symphony and Opera, Central City Opera, San Diego Opera, Portland Opera, Boston Lyric Opera, and Opera Theatre of St. Louis.  She has worked with many well-known directors, including Colin Graham, John Copley, Lotfi Mansouri, Paul Curran, and Ken Cazan.  Elise resides in Portland, OR, is a graduate of the Conservatory of Theatre Arts at Webster University in St. Louis, and has served as an OPERA America Fellow.

In October, she made her debuts with Asheville Lyric Opera directing a new production of Romeo and Juliet, and with Minnesota Opera directing James Robinson’s production of The Abduction from the Seraglio.  She joins Tacoma Opera in March to direct Faust.

Elise’s production concept of Einstein on the Beach has advanced to the finals of OPERA America’s Director-Designer Showcase, and will be presented at the OPERA America conference this spring.
 
 web.mac.com/elisesandell/Director_Website/Welcome.html

In Così fan tutte, characters come in pairs. Here Ryan MacPherson and Angela Niederloh share their takes on Ferrando and Dorabella.


Robert Orth and Christine Brandes dish about Don Alfonso and Despina.


Elise Sandell discusses the wonderful ambiguities of directing Così fan tutte.


Maestro George Manahan loves Mozart, and it's hard not to agree.


Keith Phares and Lauren Skuce put Guglielmo and Fiordiligi in the spotlight.

Listen to the Music

Soave sia il vento

Sorry, flash is not available.

Dammi un bacio o mio tesoro

Sorry, flash is not available.

Per pieta, ben mio, perdona

Sorry, flash is not available.

Fortunato l'uom che prende

Sorry, flash is not available.

Musical excerpts used courtesy of Angel Records/EMI Classics.

Schedule

Feb 5, 2010
Friday 7:30 pm
Feb 7, 2010
Sunday 2:00 pm
Feb 11, 2010
Thursday 7:30 pm
Feb 13, 2010
Saturday 7:30 pm